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June is a great month for . . .

135035709766tcdJune is one of those particularly great months of the year – graduation, sleep-away camp, the LSAT and weddings. An upcoming wedding in my family reminded me of the usefulness of taking any event and turning it into a Logic Game.

As we plan the wedding, we have to decide who will be invited –selection – the table the guest will sit at, as well as with whom he will sit –distribution- the music to be played –another selection element- and finally the order in which the bridal party will walk down the aisle, sequencing. Of course, with any wedding there are also other issues to be dealt, such as finances and family, but that is another story.

What is the purpose of taking a joyous event and turning it into a logic game? The opportunity for logic games practice abounds, whether you are involved in a wedding or in any of hundreds of day to day scenarios. I tell my students that logic games accounts for about 23% of their LSAT score, but about 80% of test day anxiety. Of course simply thinking about logic games and turning events into mock games will not in and of itself result in great LSAT scores; however, seeing the real life situations in which these games occur will help to ease some of the anxiety about them. You know that old saying: “familiarity breeds contempt”? I am not sure that it is really true-often familiarity simply takes away the fear and enables success.

Whether you are part of a couple to be married, or a guest at a wedding, take time to think how can I use this opportunity to practice Logic Games? No wedding in sight? Use graduation or a barbecue and think of how you can create a game out of it. As a start think of the guests as entities and ask yourself what you can do to create a game – select some guests to be invited and omit others. Or perhaps there is the opportunity for formal logic: If Sam is invited, I can’t invite Jeffrey. (If J-> no S; if S à no J), or if Mary doesn’t come, I will invite Arlene (If no M àA; if no A àM). For a barbeque, what items will be placed on what plate? What order should the food be served?

Regardless of when you are planning to take the LSAT, don’t miss the opportunity to prepare for it. With day-to-day practice and prep, familiarity will breed success!

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